VOA

AFRICA PROJECTS

Project Area:-

Addis Ababa: the capital city of Ethiopia which covers an area of 540 sq km has a population of 2,725,002 per the 1994 population and housing census bureau. The city is divided into ten sub-cities and 100 Kebeles. Among these sub-cities, the project area is located in Yeka, on the east side of the capital, with a total population of 295,050, of which approximately 51.6% are female.

Women & Youth Economic Empowerment - Life Skill Trainings

Vision on Africa (VoA) strives to achieve self sustainable development projects through our mothers & youth development program in Ethiopia; whereby mothers & youth be proficient with our life skill training and marketing skim with affordable local raw materials.  Thus generate income in a self sustained method, create competition for eco-friendly fine finished hand-made products, preserve the African Heritage and enhance economic empowerment programs to create resourceful, independent and skilled community.

Sisal (Katcha) Crafting  

Vision on Africa (VoA) strives to achieve self sustainable development projects through our mothers & youth development program in Ethiopia; whereby mothers & youth be proficient with our life skill training and marketing skim with affordable local raw materials.  Thus generate income in a self sustained method, create competition for eco-friendly fine finished hand-made products, preserve the African Heritage and enhance economic empowerment programs to create resourceful, independent and skilled community.

Pottery

We provide pottery classes which consists of identifying the five types of ingredients in preparing clay mineral, sifting, winnowing, grinding the old shards for temper, evaluating the right proportion of the clay to bind, strengthen and preventing it from shrinking and cracking, forming and smoothing the coiled clay by hand:  shaping vessels, building up by adding coils of clay that are shaped for the intended form, hand-scraped and smoothed to its desired thinness,  drying to the right hardness, sanded smooth with stone, drying, firing, post firing and treatments.  The firing is performed in a traditional manner, first on the inside and then on the outside using dry twigs, grasses, leaves and brushwood.  The trainees produce pots, jars, bowls, pitchers, canteens, flower vases, candle holders, oil/potpourri burners, chafing dishes, storytellers figural, miniature ornaments representing the Ethiopian history and tradition.  Every creation is unique.  

Hammocks

We provide training on how to make “green” hammocks from 100% cotton ropes, with no synthetic additives.  The selected spanned yarn is hand twisted in three-ply. Techniques are shown to each trainee determining proper length and size for a one or two person hammock. Using gauge stick, hardwood bars and metal rings casting, tied bowline knots or square knots are made out of twines. Side braids are added with enough length to sag the net in the middle so that it holds a body comfortably. The last step is trimming the ends and marketing the finished products.

Candle Making

Our Candle Making venture helps strengthen the income-generating capacity of our trainees and foster a multi-skilled and economically empowered community.

Integrated Mother and Child Health Care, Focusing on Community Based Prevention of Mother-to-Child Transmission (PMTCT) of HIV/AIDS

About 200 million women around the world become pregnant each year, of these about 2.5 million are HIV positive. One of the biggest challenges is to ensure those pregnant women who have not acquired the virus remain HIV-negative. This challenge is integrally linked to the wide-range effort of preventing Mother-To-Child Transmission of HIV.

The Ethiopian Ministry of Health (MOH) estimates the adult HIV prevalence rate in urban areas at 13.7%. In addition, about 94% of HIV/AIDS victims are people in their reproductive years (age 15-49).

The primary objective of this project is to contribute to the national effort of reducing mother-to-child transmission of HIV/AIDS. More specifically, the project seeks, inter alias, to:-

  • Improve awareness in the target community regarding the issue of prevention of mother-to-child transmission; and
  • Increase mother and child health service in the area by opening and making available one Mother and Child Health Care Center in the project area.

 

 

VoA has established a Mother and Child Integrated Health Center in Yeka Sub-City, Addis Ababa. The center currently provides:-

  1. Immunizations
  2. Antenatal Care
  3. Voluntary Counseling and Testing (VCT)
  4. Health Education including (IEC/BCC); Information, Education & Communication as well as Behavioral Communication Changes
  5. Family Planning
  6. Laboratory Tests
  7. Sensitization
  8. Community Integrated Management and Child Illness (IMCI)
  9. Prevention of Mother-to-Child Transmission of HIV/AIDS (PMTCT)

Fray Reproductive Health and Anti AIDS Youth Association

VoA has partnered with Fray Reproductive Health and Anti AIDS Youth Association of the Kotebe area to help the youth play a significant role in making a measurable impact within their community and lead a purpose-driven life. So far there are 30 active youth members participating in the following programs VoA provides:

    1. Career Development Counseling Workshop
    2. Capacity Building/Skill Enhancements Workshop
    3. Reproductive Health and Anti AIDS Workshop
    4. Introduction of Sustainable Development Programs Workshop
    5. Youth Sensitization Workshop
    6. Peer-Group Networking Workshop
    7. Career Advancement Network with the Private Sector Workshop
    8. Community Integrated Management Child Illness (IMCI) Workshop
    9. Survey Data Collection Workshop

Members of the Youth Association are also actively involved in conducting the VoA Baseline Survey, Reproductive Health Intervention, IEC/BCC Intervention and Anti-HIV/AIDS Campaigns. They also participate in the Arts & Crafts workshops twice a week. They have successfully learned how to make stuffed animals, ladies hand bags, wallets, jewelry boxes, etc. as shown below.

Kidane Meheret Elderly Care and Services (KMECAS)

The number of Ethiopians living with HIV/AIDS in 2001 is estimated at 2.2 million, including 2 million adults and 200,000 children. Approximately 10 percent of these or 219,400 are full blown AIDS cases. About 91 percent of infections occur among adults between 15 and 49 years, the most productive group of society. One of the tragedies of the epidemic is that the breadwinners of the family die leaving behind orphans and other dependents.

As a result, the elderly have become the most victimized and yet neglected groups of the Ethiopian society.

The objectives of this project are to:

  • Provide shelter, nutrition and medication to the elderly homeless.
  • Provide monthly stipend to destitute elderly who have to support their grandchildren.
  • Provide training in income generating schemes to those elderly who are trainable or skill upgrading to those who are already skilled.

 

Fitawrari Lake Adgeh Primary School

The Fitawrari Lake Adgeh Primary Scholl located at Nifas Silk, Sub-City Kebele 09/14, provides education to 2,622 students. Out of the total number of students, 262 are orphans - 93 males and 169 females. The educational status of orphan vulnerable children (OVC) ranges form grade 1 to 8. The School has a total number of 88 employees - 71 teachers, 8 administration staff and 9 support staff.

The livelihood support mechanisms of OVC are:-
 
Roasted Grain Vending; Maid Service; Shoe Shining; Daily Labor; Extended Family Support and Loitering
Vision on Africa has taken the first step in helping the 262 Orphans through provision of material and moral support.
The following pictures are taken during Vision on Africa's visit of the School in conjunction with Mary Joy Aid through Development on April 8, 2005

 

Zewaye Orphan Vulnerable Children (OVC)

VoA has recently recognized the immediate need of orphans in Zewaye, a region that is 164 km south of Addis Ababa, the capital of Ethiopia. VoA focuses in supporting orphans in a monastery established about 25 years ago. The orphan houses about 30 children and is led by an Ethiopian priest that resides in that region.

History: The orphanage center in the monastery was first established in 1978 by Archbishop Abune Georgorios, an Ethiopian Orthodox bishop in Ethiopia. The Archbishop went to Zewaye and was quick to observe the presence of an abject poverty in that region. Abune instantly established an orphanage center within the monastery and took 12 children to the monastery; where he began to teach them basic education i.e., reading/writing and arithmetic skills. Abune Georgorios taught that since the area was not safe for these children, the orphanage must be set within the monastery. Whatever money was left from the clergy and with the help of some dedicated contributors, the Archbishop was dedicated to raise these children. In that way, Abune Georgorios led the orphanage vigorously from 1978 to 1990 and he passed away in 1990. Currently, the center is supported by Ethiopians both living in and abroad.

Since the land in Zewaye is not fertile, only 1/4 of the land is used to plant vegetables and fruits. The center generates some fund from the sales of these produce to pay basic utilities.

Today, the children in this orphanage still live in poverty. Although the center has managed to enhance the living conditions for these children, the children are still not able to eat proper meals during the day, are not able to visit doctors as needed and have to travel miles to go to school. Thus, with the donation of $1.00 a day from concerned individuals, VoA plans to cover their medical and dietary needs as well as hire a local teacher for the under aged children to avoid walking of miles just to attend schools. All interested individuals can either give a onetime donation or sponsor a child for just a $30.00 a month.

 

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